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Carrots


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Carrots



Carrots

CULTURE: Any good garden or field soil will grow carrots. Deep, loose, and fertile sandy loams and peat soils with good moisture-holding capacity grow the straightest and smoothest roots.
PLANTING: Sow from early spring to mid-July, 3/4-1" apart (about 30 seeds/ft.), 1/4- 1/2" deep, in 2" wide rows, 16-24" apart. For minimum soil compaction, use raised beds with 2 or 3 rows 16-24" apart, beds 5-6' on center. Sprinkle the soil surface to keep moist. Don't allow soil to crust before the emergence of seedlings which take 1-3 weeks, depending on temperature and moisture. If soil moisture during germination is an issue, we recommend using pelleted seed. If necessary, thin young seedlings to 3/4-2" apart, depending on root size desired. Keep weed-free by tine weeding and shallow hoeing. To prevent greening, cover exposed crowns.
DISEASES: Blights can reduce yield and quality. Alternaria blight shows as brown-black lesions edged with yellow on leaf margins beginning on oldest leaves. Leaflets may shrivel and die. Cercospora blight first appears as small dark spots with yellow margins on the younger leaves and stems. To prevent blights, practice 3-year crop rotation. Copper fungicides (see Index) can be employed as a preventive measure or control.
INSECT PESTS: Carrot rust fly and wireworms. Provide fertile growing conditions and avoid ground recently in sod if possible. Exclude adult insects with fabric row covers (see Index.)
HARVEST: Carrots may be dug any time after they reach a good orange color (bright, not pale), at which stage flavor develops. Generally the best harvest period lasts about 3 weeks (longer in cool, fall weather), after which time the roots may crack or the taste and appearance may decline. Make a few sowings at 3 week intervals for a continuous supply of tender carrots at their prime.
STORAGE: Plant carrots intended for winter storage about 100 days before expected fall frost. Carrots store best at 32F (0C) and 95% RH.
AVG. SEEDING RATE: 600'/oz. or 18M, 9,600'/lb. or 288M, 2 1/2 lb./acre (at 30 seeds/ft. in rows 24" apart) or 72M.
GRADED SEEDS: Standard on all varieties except where noted.
CARROT TYPE: Each type is identified in catalog copy. Nantes are medium length and cylindrical. The Shipping/Imperator types have the extra length and durability required in conventional packaged carrots, and perform the best in deeply worked soil. Chantenays are top-shaped and suitable for shallow or heavy soil. Kuroda types have thick, cylindrical roots and can be darker than average in color. They are suitable for tropical winter production (CA, TX, FL) or temperate summer production (where winters get below 45-50F (7-13C).
SEED SPECS: SEEDS/LB.: 175,000-600,000 (avg. 288,000).
PACKET: 750 seeds (avg. 1.2 gm.) sows 25'.


Carrots


THE BENEFITS OF CARROTS

The health benefits of carrot include reduced cholesterol, prevention from heart attacks, warding off certain cancers and many others. Most of the benefits of carrot can be attributed to its beta carotene and fiber content. This root, which has a scientific name of Daucus Carota, is a good source of antioxidant agents as well. Carrots are rich in vitamin A, Vitamin C, Vitamin K, and potassium.

Both adults and children like carrots because of its crunchy texture and sweet taste. Even though the color of original carrot is orange it grows in other colors including white, yellow, red or purple.

The health benefits of carrot include the following:

  • Prevent heart diseases: In a study meant to reveal therapeutic value of carrots researchers at the Wolfson Gastrointestinal Laboratory in Edinburgh, Scotland revealed that cholesterol level reduces by 11 percent if seven ounces of raw carrots a day is taken for thee weeks. High cholesterol is a major factor for heart disease. Since regular consumption of carrots reduces cholesterol level it is good to prevent heart related problems. A group of Swedish scientists discovered that root vegetables can reduce the chances of having a heart attack. A study conducted at the Mario Negri Institute of Pharmacological Research in Italy found that those who ate more carrots had one third the risk of heart attack as compared with those who ate fewer carrots.
  • Prevent cancer: Beta-carotene consumption has been linked to reduced risk of several cancers, notably lung cancer. British researchers discovered that increasing beta-carotene consumption from 1.7 to 2.7 milligrams a day reduced lung cancer risk more than 40 percent. The average carrot contains about three milligrams of Beta-carotene. In a study, researchers found that eating fiber rich carrots reduce the risk of colon cancer by as much as 24 percent. Another study shows that women who ate raw carrots were five to eight times less likely to develop breast cancer than women who did not eat carrots.
  • Macular degeneration: This is a common eye disease of elderly. It impairs the macula. Researches found that people who ate the most Beta-carotene had a forty percent lower risk of macular degeneration compared with those who consumed the least.
  • Improves eyesight: Deficiency of vitamin A can cause some difficulty seeing in dim light. Since carrot is rich in vitamin A it is good for improving eyesight.
  • Stroke: A carrot a day reduces stroke risk by 68 percent. Many studies have strengthened the "carrot effect" on brain. Studies conducted on stroke patients revealed that those with highest levels of Beta carotene have the best survival rate.
  • Diabetes: Carrot is good for blood sugar regulation because of the presence of carotenoids in carrot. Carotenoids inversely affect insulin resistance and thus lower blood sugar.

Carrots have antiseptic qualities and therefore, can be used as laxative, vermicide and as remedy for liver conditions. Carrot oil is good for dry skin. It makes the skin softer, smoother and firmer. Carrot juice improves stomach and gastrointestinal health.