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Celery & Celeriac


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Celery & Celeriac



Celery & Celeriac

CULTURE: Celery and celeriac must be kept well-fertilized and watered throughout the season. Do not let the soil dry out, indoors or out. Ensure fertile soil for good size and mild taste.
GROWING SEEDLINGS: Sow in early March or 10-12 weeks before transplanting outdoors. Sow about 6 seeds per inch, 1/8" deep, and keep soil moist and temperatures 70-75F (21-24C) if possible. Seedlings emerge in 2-3 weeks and then temperature can be reduced to 60-70F (16-21C).
TRANSPLANTING: When seedlings have 2 true leaves, transplant to 1 1/2" plug trays. Transplant outdoors in late May to mid-June when weather is warm and settled. Set plants 6-8" apart in rows 24-36" apart. Irrigate to keep soil moist.
HARVEST: Late summer through fall at a 3-5" diameter.
BOLTING: Caused by exposure of young plants to temperatures below 55F (13C) for 10 days or more. When hardening plants before transplanting out, reduce water for 7-10 days. Do not harden off celery plants by lowering temperatures!
DISEASES AND PESTS: For leaf blights, rotate crops. Ensure adequate soil calcium and water to prevent "black heart". For Celery Mosaic (mottled leaves, twisted stems, dwarfing), control aphids.
STORAGE: After harvest remove field heat by dunking plants in cold water. Store sound heads/roots at 95-98% humidity and near-freezing temps.
DAYS TO MATURITY: From date of transplanting.
CAUTION: In rare instances contact with the foliage can result in a severe rash. When working with this crop on hot, sunny days, we recommend wearing long sleeves and long pants and washing any exposed skin surfaces as soon as possible after contact.
SEED SPECS: SEEDS/OZ: 65,850-68,750 (avg. 67,300).
MINI: 0.125 gm. (avg. 325 seeds) sows 4'.


Throughout the season, remove any lateral and lower shoots to help the root develop a smooth surface.

Celeriac, also known as turnip-rooted celery or celery root, offers fine-grained white flesh with a taste that always reminds me of the main ingredients in Waldorf salad: celery, apples, and walnuts. Although a close relative of celery, this lesser-known kin is far easier to grow as long as your summers aren't dry and hot. Like most fall and winter root vegetables, it is a great keeper and will remain in good condition for four to six months in a root cellar or refrigerator crisper.

Celery & Celeriac


Celery is generally considered to be the ultimate vegetable gardening challenge. It has a very long growing season but a very low tolerance for both heat and cold. There is not much flavor difference between the home grown variety and the store bought variety so most gardeners grow a celery plant purely for the challenge it poses. Read on to find out more about the best way to grow celery in your garden.

Celeriac - It's safe to say that celeriac will never be featured in photos of baskets brimming with luscious, perfect produce. In fact, one look at this knobby, dun-colored vegetable with its messy fringe of rootlets and the description "hit by the ugly stick" might come to mind. However, looks aren't everything. Celeriac is grown for its knobby root rather than for its leaves. It is easier to grow than celery and has a long storage life and a smooth celery flavor I find useful in the kitchen.

Celeriac might look like a tangled, inedible mess, but with a little preparation, this mild celery-flavored root moves easily from garden to kitchen. Celeriac transplants are hard to find in garden centers, so you'll have to grow your own.