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Cooling Jars and Testing Jar Seals


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Cooling Jars and Testing Jar Seals

The high percentage of water in most fresh foods makes them very perishable. They spoil or lose their quality for several reasons:

  • growth of undesirable microorganisms-bacteria, molds, and yeasts,
  • activity of food enzymes,
  • reactions with oxygen,
  • moisture loss.

Cooling jars

Illustration of using a rack during cooling period

When you remove hot jars from a canner, do not retighten their jar lids. Re-tightening of hot lids may cut through the gasket and cause seal failures. Cool the jars at room temperature for 12 to 24 hours. Jars may be cooled on racks or towels to minimize heat damage to counters. The food level and liquid volume of raw-packed jars will be noticeably lower after cooling. Air is exhausted during processing and food shrinks. If a jar loses excessive liquid during processing, do not open it to add more liquid. Check for sealed lids as described below.

Testing jar seals

After cooling jars for 12 to 24 hours, remove the screw bands and test seals with one of the following options:

Option 1. Press the middle of the lid with a finger or thumb. If the lid springs up when you release your finger, the lid is unsealed.
Option 2. Tap the lid with the bottom of a teaspoon. If it makes a dull sound, the lid is not sealed. If food is in contact with the underside of the lid, it will also cause a dull sound. If the jar is sealed correctly, it will make a ringing, high-pitched sound.
Option 3. Hold the jar at eye level and look across the lid. The lid should be concave (curved down slightly in the center). If center of the lid is either flat or bulging, it may not be sealed.

Illustration of previously mention options for testing seals.

Reprocessing unsealed jars

If a lid fails to seal on a jar, remove the lid and check the jar-sealing surface for tiny nicks. If necessary, change the jar, add a new, properly prepared lid, and reprocess within 24 hours using the same processing time. Headspace in unsealed jars may be adjusted to 1 1/2 inches and jars could be frozen instead of reprocessed. Foods in single unsealed jars could be stored in the refrigerator and consumed within several days.




General Information

  • General Information - Jams & Jelly Products
  • Types of Jellied Products
  • Jellied Product Ingredients


  • Extracting Juice for Jelly
  • General Information on Canning Jams, Jellies, and Marmalades
  • Making Jelly without added Pectin
  • Making Jam without added Pectin
  • Making Jams and Jellies with added Pectin
  • Processing Jams and Jellies
  • Steps in Processing Jams and Jellies
  • Testing Jelly without Added Pectin
  • Remaking Soft Jellies
  • Stiff Jams or Jellies
  • Storing Home-Canned Jams and Jellies
  • Causes and Possible Solutions for Problems with Jellied Fruit Products
  • These documents were adapted from the "Complete Guide to Home Canning," Agriculture Information Bulletin No. 539, USDA, revised 2009 &
    From "So Easy to Preserve", 5th ed. 2006. Bulletin 989, Cooperative Extension Service, The University of Georgia, Athens. Revised by Elizabeth L. Andress. Ph.D. and Judy A. Harrison, Ph.D., Extension Foods Specialists.