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Hyssop


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Hyssop



Growing Information:

Hyssop

DAYS TO GERMINATION: 5-21 days

SOWING TIME: Spring

SEEDING METHOD: Direct or Transplant

SUNLIGHT PREFERENCE: Sun/Part Shade

PLANT HEIGHT: 16-24"

PLANT SPACING: 6-12"

HARDINESS ZONES: Zones 3-9

Habitat and Description


Growing Hyssop
CULTURAL REQUIREMENTS

Choose a sunny spot where the soil drains well or is dry. In early spring, sow seeds 1/4 inch deep in rows about 1 foot apart. In early summer, thin the seedlings to about 1 foot apart within the rows. Prune the plants occasionally and remove flower heads.

Hyssop require little maintenance. Hyssop Plants may need to be replaced every 4 to 5 years. Harvest just before the flowers begin to open. Hang in bunches upside down in a shady, warm, airy location. Remove the leaves and flowers from the stems. Place in airtight containers. Harvest only the green plant matter since the tough woody parts have little flavor and scent.



Hyssop


The benefits of Hyssop

Hyssop is cultivated for the use of its flower-tops, which are steeped in water to make an infusion, which is sometimes employed as an expectorant. Hyssop has been prescribed for a multitude of medical conditions. It is known as an antispasmodic, expectorant, emmenagogue, stimulant and tonic. It is used for cough, bronchitis and chronic catarrh, and has a tonic effect on the digestive, urinary, nervous and bronchial systems. Culpeper recommended allowing the hot vapors of a hyssop decoction to reach the ear by means of a funnel to ease inflammation and tinnitus. He also prescribed hyssop boiled in wine and vinegar for bruises.





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