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Jerusalem Artichoke


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Jerusalem Artichoke



Jerusalem Artichoke

CULTURE: As soon as possible after seed pieces are received, cut or break to one or two eyes per piece. Plant pieces 4" deep and 12-18" apart. Do not allow cut seed pieces to dry out before planting. Almost any garden soil will do, even wet or dry soils. Choose a permanent location as Jerusalem Artichokes are difficult to eliminate once established.
HARVEST: Dig tubers in August to late fall as needed.
NOTE: Directly after harvest, the carbohydrates are in the form of inulin and are good for dieters and diabetics. The inulin changes gradually in storage to other starches and should then be regarded more like a potato by diabetics.
STORAGE: Can be frozen or kept refrigerated in plastic bags. Can be stored un-dug in the garden, or in the root cellar as long as tubers are kept moist to prevent shriveling. The next crop can be planted from harvested tubers or you can leave some in the ground to grow again. About a dozen seed pieces per pound. Plant tuber pieces upon receipt, or store in vegetable crisper in refrigerator until spring.


Jerusalem Artichoke


THE BENEFITS OF JERUSALEM ARTICHOKES

Although knobby and rather ugly-looking, the Jerusalem artichoke is a vegetable worth discovering. Also called a sunchoke, the Jerusalem artichoke is rich in iron and vitamin C. What's more, this seemingly forgotten vegetable has some rather admirable benefits in addition to its vitamin content. Learn why the Jerusalem artichoke is a vegetable worth getting to know and worth taking a spot on your plate.

Jerusalem Artichoke: Hidden Ingredient

Move over potato. There's a new guy on the block. Actually, the Jerusalem artichoke isn't all that new; it's been around for years. A popular vegetable in other countries, it has yet to come into its own in the US. But this tuber is already in many food products masquerading as a food starch. So chance are you've enjoyed the Jerusalem artichoke and not even known it.

Jerusalem Artichoke: Looks and Taste

An elongated reddish-brown tuber, the Jerusalem artichoke has a thin skin and white flesh. The vegetable can substitute for potatoes, turnips, or parsnips. The root looks a bit like a ginger root, and the taste is like that of a potato mixed with an artichoke heart. A sweet, nutty, crisp vegetable--it's much like a jicama or water chestnut.