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Parsnips


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Parsnips



Parsnips

CULTURE: Parsnips like a deep, friable "carrot" soil. Sow in early to midspring in a 2" band about 1" apart (20 seeds/ft.), 1/2" deep, in rows 18-24" apart. Seed normally requires 3 weeks to germinate. Do not allow soil to dry out prior to emergence. Thin plants to 2-3" apart.
HARVEST: Mow tops and fork or undermine, or use root crop harvester. Parsnips require a full season of growth and their sweet flavor is brought on by cold weather. Dig the balance of what is left in the field after heavy frosts for the highest quality spring harvest.
STORAGE: Hold washed or unwashed in perforated bags or bins at near freezing and humid.
AVG. DIRECT SEEDING RATE: 250'/oz., 4 oz./1000', 5.5 lb./acre at 20 seeds/ft. in rows 24" apart.
SEED SPECS: SEEDS/LB.: 70,500-115,000 (avg. 98,000).
MINI: 2 gm. (avg. 350 seeds) sows 25'.
CAUTION: In rare instances contact with the foliage can result in a severe rash. When working with this crop on hot, sunny days, we recommend wearing long sleeves and long pants and washing any exposed skin surfaces as soon as possible after contact.
GERMINATION GUIDE: Please refer to "Carrots".


Parsnips


THE BENEFITS OF PARSNIPS

Physically similar to the carrot, a parsnip is paler and has a stronger flavor than the former. It is native to Eurasia and has been consumed since ancient times. Parsnip is a biannual plant with a thick root and a succulent pulp, having a specific flavor. The plant is usually of a grayish white or yellowish color. Parsnip leaves are larger than those of parsley or carrot, with a shine on one side and puffiness on the other. The plant is cultivated either on level ground, in calcareous soil found on roadsides or at an altitude of 1600 meters. The plant blossoms from June till August and only its roots are consumed.

Parsnips shine as a fiber source. They're high in soluble fiber, the type that helps lower cholesterol and keep blood sugar on an even keel. They're a surprising source of folic acid, that B vitamin which women who are planning a family require to help reduce the risk of certain disabling birth defects. Folic acid also plays a role in reducing heart disease and may help prevent dementia and osteoporosis bone fractures. And potassium, an aid to blood pressure, is present in ample quantities. Unlike their carrot cousins, however, parsnips lack beta carotene.

They include a high sugar and starch content. This vegetable contains more fiber then most other vegetables It's rich in Vitamin B6, Vitamin C and Vitamin E. Parsnips provide the body with copper, manganese and folic acid. Niacin, thiamine, magnesium, and potassium are all found in Parsnips. They also help reduce high blood pressure, constipation and heart problems. When choosing parsnips at the market go for crisp and firm, evenly colored tubers and store them in a plastic bag in the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days.

Parsnips provide similar nutritional benefits as potatoes. Some ignificant differences are that parsnips are lower in calories and contain only about 50 percent of the protein and vitamin C content of potatoes. However, parsnips do contain more fiber than potatoes. Even though both parsnips and potatoes provide good amounts of B vitamins, parsnips provide a much better source of folic acid. Carbohydrates are the only fuel source for many vital organs, including the brain, central nervous system and kidneys. Parsnips are a good source of vitamin C and niacin. and also provide some vitamin E, potassium and dietary fiber.