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Peas



Peas

CULTURE: Peas are a cool weather crop. Midsummer pickings are not as prolific as cool or mild weather harvests. For best yields ensure abundant phosphorus and a pH of 6.0-7.5. Adjust pH with ground limestone or wood ashes during planting. Plant the first sowing in early spring as soon as the soil can be worked. In well-drained soil, sow 1-1 1/2" apart in a 3" band (25 seeds/ft.), 1/2-1" deep. Make rows 12-18" apart for dwarf types, 4-6' apart if using a trellis. For easier picking, provide support at planting time with a trellis (see Index) supported by posts. Do not thin. Harvest when peas enlarge in the pods.
FALL CROP: Choose powdery mildew resistant varieties. Sow about 2 months before frost.
INOCULANT: Treat with a bacterial inoculant suitable for peas to help increase yields (see Index).
TREATED SEEDS: Some varieties are offered UNTREATED and TREATED (T). Untreated seeds are more susceptible to rotting in prolonged cold, wet weather.
DISEASES: The most common disease is probably pea root rot (Fusarium sp. or Aphanomyces euteiches) which causes browning and drying of the foliage from the ground up. The best control is to ensure well-drained soil and to rotate crops out of legumes for at least three years. Powdery mildew causes white, powdery mold on the leaves, stems, and pods in hot weather. Choose resistant varieties.
FREEZING: All our peas are good for freezing and canning.
AVG. SEEDING RATE: 80'/lb., 13 lb./1,000', 270 lb./acre at 25 seeds/ft., in rows 24" apart.
SEED SPECS: SEEDS/LB.: 1,500-2,700 (avg. 2,000).
PACKET: 3 oz. (avg. 375 seeds) sows 15'.


Peas


THE BENEFITS OF PEAS

Helping You Bone Up

Green peas provide nutrients that are important for maintaining bone health. They are a very good source of vitamin K, some of which our bodies convert into K2, which activates osteocalcin, the major non-collagen protein in bone. Osteocalcin anchors calcium molecules inside of the bone. Therefore, without enough vitamin K2, osteocalcin levels are inadequate and bone mineralization is impaired.

Green peas also serve as a very good source of folic acid and a good source of vitamin B6. These two nutrients help to reduce the buildup of a metabolic byproduct called homocysteine, a dangerous molecule can obstruct collagen cross-linking, resulting in poor bone matrix and osteoporosis. One study showed that postmenopausal women who were not considered deficient in folic acid lowered their homocysteine levels simply by supplementing with folic acid by itself.

Help Your Heart by Passing the Peas, Please

In addition to affecting bone health, homocysteine contributes to atherosclerosis through its ability to damage the blood vessels, keeping them in a constant state of injury. Therefore the folic acid and vitamin B6 in green peas are supportive of cardiovascular health as well. In fact, folic acid is so important for cardiovascular function that a major 1995 study concluded that 400 micrograms per day of folic acid could prevent 28,000 cardiovascular deaths per year in the United States.

The contributions of green peas to heart health do not stop there. The vitamin K featured in green peas is instrumental to the body's healthy blood clotting ability.

Contributions to Energy and Overall Wellness

Green peas are one of the important foods to include in your diet if you oftentimes feel fatigued and sluggish. That is because they provide nutrients that help support the energy-producing cells and systems of the body.

Green peas a very good source of thiamin-vitamin B1 and a good source of vitamin B6, riboflavin-vitamin B2 and niacin-vitamin B3, all of which are nutrients that are necessary for carbohydrate, protein and lipid metabolism. Green peas are also a good source of iron, a mineral necessary for normal blood cell formation and function, whose deficiency results in anemia, fatigue, decreased immune function, and learning problems. In addition, green peas are a very good source of vitamin C, which protects many energy-producing cells and systems in the body from free radical damage. Body tissues with particularly high vitamin C requirements include the adrenal glands, ocular lens, liver, immune system, connective tissues, and fats circulating in the blood.